Tag Archives: Windows 7

OneDrive Splash Screen

OneDrive on Windows 8.1 Updated with New Features for Desktop Users!

One of the updates for Patch Tuesday on June 10, 2014 was for Microsoft OneDrive. This update brought significant UI update for desktop users. Let’s check it out. Continue reading

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Multiple Modern IE Windows

Windows 8.1 Update 1: Multi-Window Taskbar Thumbnails for Windows Store (Metro) Apps

We kicked off our information about Windows 8.1 Update one with new taskbar features coming to Windows Store apps, namely the Jumplists and media controls. Today, I want to share with you another neat feature I uncovered. Windows Store (metro) applications running in multiple Windows show up in the taskbar as multiple windows. This behavior is the same in Desktop Applications since Windows 7. It is nice to see that it is being included in Windows Store applications. Continue reading

Montreal Metro Sign

Why Metro UI Doesn’t Have a Name (Original Article from Summer 2012)

I had originally written this article as a guest-post on newoin.net on August 2012. To see the guest post, please click here.

Montreal Metro Sign

According to Microsoft, Windows 8 is “a bold reimagining of Windows, from the chipset to the user experience.” This reimagining, then, brings a completely new user interface to Windows 8, an UI that is a    complete departure from any previous versions of Windows. And since the first unveiling of Windows 8 and throughout its public preview releases, this new UI has been referred to, by the community, as the Metro UI because it follows the Microsoft’s design language that was known as the Metro design language. Microsoft itself referred to apps running on the reimagined Windows 8 platform (WinRT) as Metro Style apps. Why, then, isn’t the term “Metro” ever referred to in the operating system itself? More importantly, why does Microsoft officially refuse to name the new, reimagined, user interface?

According to Paul Thurrott in Windows Weekly podcast episode 274, when asked, Microsoft personnel would gladly call the classic desktop as the Windows 8 desktop, but they would never call the new UI by any particular name. When asked explicitly what the name of the new UI in Windows 8 is, they just called it Windows. So basically, we have the Windows desktop and, simply, Windows, and not desktop and Metro. At first, this seems quite strange because why would there not be an official name to the new UI in Windows 8; I will admit that I was quite confused by this as well. However, given some time to think about this, I am able to understand what Microsoft is trying to get at.

The trick to all this is to approach Windows 8 in a fundamentally different way. That is, we must not think of Windows 8 as having the Metro UI on top of the Windows 7 desktop, but rather, we should approach Windows 8 as having the Metro UI as the primary UI with desktop as the secondary option. Conceptually, Windows 8 is Metro plus desktop, and not the other way around.  Technically, Metro is not primary nor secondary because both desktop and Metro is part of explorer.exe. But if we conceptually see the Metro UI as the primary Windows user interface, there is no need to really call it anything but the Windows UI. For instance, we don’t call the UI in Windows 7 the desktop UI or the Aero UI, but, rather, we call simply call it the Windows 7 user interface. This is the same with Windows XP, or Mac OSX. We call OSX’s Aqua user interface by, well, OSX user interface. The same principle applies to Windows 8, if we consider metro to be the primary UI. Metro, then is the Windows 8 UI, and because the desktop is now secondary in Windows 8, the classic Windows UI in Windows 8 is given a name of “desktop”.

Paul Thurrott does bring up a valid point that term Windows 8 UI is time bound, whereas something like Metro is timeless.  That is, when, say, Windows 9 is released, the term Windows 8 UI will make no sense. I completely agree with this argument. I believe the proper name of the Windows 8 UI is Windows UI. In Windows 7 and prior, for example, the tem Windows UI represented what is now the classic desktop. There was no need to call it Windows 7 UI or Windows Vista UI because the UI paradigm was the same in these versions of Windows. Because the UI paradigm is changing in Windows 8, the metro UI in Windows 8 is being referred to as “Windows 8 UI” rather than simply “Windows UI” for differentiation. However, I do think that in the future, the new Metro UI will simply be referred to as the Windows UI. I believe in the future, when we hear the term Windows UI, we will think of what is now called Metro and we will refer to the classic UI as the desktop. Similarly, we will soon refer to Metro Style apps as Windows Apps and the traditional Windows apps as Desktop Apps.

Windows 8 is as much a transitional OS as it is a reimagining of Windows. Hence, terms such as Windows 8 UI or Windows 8 Apps are only temporary, which will eventually be replaced by broader terms such as Windows UI and Windows Apps. Metro, or Modern, or whatever they are calling it these days may be still referred to the design language itself, just like Aero or Aqua is.

Classic Windows Logo

How to Delete the Windows.old folder after a Windows Upgrade or Reinstall

Classic Windows Logo

If you have upgraded Windows or reinstalled it without formatting your hard drive, you may notice that there is a Windows.old folder on the C drive (or a your primary hard drive partition). This folder contains files from the previous windows install. The folder is used to back up potentially important personal files or to roll back to the previous OS in case of an installation failure. However, the folder takes up large amount of disk space. If you have personal files in there, you can move them out of the folder, but everything else is pretty much useless. You will want to delete that folder to save disk space. But you need to delete it properly, and we’ll show you how to do just that!

Note that if you are on Windows 8 or Windows 8.1 (or their server and ARM counterparts), most of the content of the folder will automatically be deleted after some time. But you might still want to do a full cleanup. You cannot simply delete it like a normal folder, as Windows will block you from doing so. You will need to use Disk Cleanup.

This will clean up the Windows.old content completely and give you back large amounts of disk space. However, we must launch disk cleanup as an administrator. Follow the steps below, it should work.

Try these steps (in exact order) to remove the Windows.old content:

If you are running Windows 7:

  • Step 1: Open the Start Menu and on the search box, type “Disk Cleanup”
  • Step 2: Right-click on “Disk Cleanup” and click “Run as Administrator”. You might need to click “Yes” or type your password. Please do that.

Please go to Step 8 below

If you are running Windows 8 or Windows 8.1:

  • Step 1: Go to the desktop, either by clicking the desktop tile or by pressing “Windows Key” + D on your Keyboard.
  • Step 2: On your Desktop, open the charms. If using touch, swipe from the right edge. If using a mouse, point mouse to lower right corner and pull up. If using the keyboard, press the keys “Windows Key” + C.
  • Step 3: Click the “Settings” charm.
  • Step 4: Click on the “Control Panel” option.
  • Step 5: On the control panel Window, click on the search box and type “Admin”.
  • Step 6: On the search result, the first item should be “Administrative Tools”. Click on “Administrative Tools”.
  • Step 7: When the “Administrative Tools” folder opens, find the item that says “Disk Cleanup”. Right click on that item, and click “Run as Administrator”. You might need to click “Yes” or type your password. Please do that.

Please go to Step 8 below

 Steps 8-10 works for Windows 7, 8, and 8.1:

  • Step 8: On the “Disk Cleanup Drive Selection” dialog box, click OK. Wait for Disk Cleanup to search your hard drive. When it finishes searching, it will pop open the Disk Cleanup Dialog Box.
  • Step 9: You will see many entries to check off. Please find the entry that says “Previous Windows Installation”. Click that. You will see how much disk space you will be saving. If you want, you can check off other items too to clear up even more disk space!
  • Step 10: Once you checked off the items, click OK to start cleaning your heard drive. This will delete the Windows.old folder and its contents! Warning: Anything on that folder will be deleted!
Classic Windows Logo

How to Delete the Windows.old folder after a Windows Upgrade or Reinstall

If you have upgraded Windows or reinstalled it without formatting your hard drive, you may notice that there is a Windows.old folder on the C drive (or a your primary hard drive partition). This folder contains files from the previous windows install. The folder is used to back up potentially important personal files or to roll back to the previous OS in case of an installation failure. However, the folder takes up large amount of disk space. If you have personal files in there, you can move them out of the folder, but everything else is pretty much useless. You will want to delete that folder to save disk space. But you need to delete it properly, and we’ll show you how to do just that!

Note that if you are on Windows 8 or Windows 8.1 (or their server and ARM counterparts), most of the content of the folder will automatically be deleted after some time. But you might still want to do a full cleanup. You cannot simply delete it like a normal folder, as Windows will block you from doing so. You will need to use Disk Cleanup.

This will clean up the Windows.old content completely and give you back large amounts of disk space. However, we must launch disk cleanup as an administrator. Follow the steps below, it should work.

Try these steps (in exact order) to remove the Windows.old content:

If you are running Windows 7:

  • Step 1: Open the Start Menu and on the search box, type “Disk Cleanup”
  • Step 2: Right-click on “Disk Cleanup” and click “Run as Administrator”. You might need to click “Yes” or type your password. Please do that.

Please go to Step 8 below

If you are running Windows 8 or Windows 8.1:

  • Step 1: Go to the desktop, either by clicking the desktop tile or by pressing “Windows Key” + D on your Keyboard.
  • Step 2: On your Desktop, open the charms. If using touch, swipe from the right edge. If using a mouse, point mouse to lower right corner and pull up. If using the keyboard, press the keys “Windows Key” + C.
  • Step 3: Click the “Settings” charm.
  • Step 4: Click on the “Control Panel” option.
  • Step 5: On the control panel Window, click on the search box and type “Admin”.
  • Step 6: On the search result, the first item should be “Administrative Tools”. Click on “Administrative Tools”.
  • Step 7: When the “Administrative Tools” folder opens, find the item that says “Disk Cleanup”. Right click on that item, and click “Run as Administrator”. You might need to click “Yes” or type your password. Please do that.

Please go to Step 8 below

 Steps 8-10 works for Windows 7, 8, and 8.1:

  • Step 8: On the “Disk Cleanup Drive Selection” dialog box, click OK. Wait for Disk Cleanup to search your hard drive. When it finishes searching, it will pop open the Disk Cleanup Dialog Box.
  • Step 9: You will see many entries to check off. Please find the entry that says “Previous Windows Installation”. Click that. You will see how much disk space you will be saving. If you want, you can check off other items too to clear up even more disk space!
  • Step 10: Once you checked off the items, click OK to start cleaning your heard drive. This will delete the Windows.old folder and its contents! Warning: Anything on that folder will be deleted!
Windows 1.0

Experiment – Upgrading through Every Version of Windows from 1.0 to 7

 

We know that it is not officially possible to upgrade anything earlier than Windows XP to Windows 8, but what if we upgraded every version of Windows in order. Woud that mean that we can essentially upgrade Windows 1.0 to Windows 2.0 to Windows 3.0 all the way to Windows 8? Well, this very experiment was done, and the results will amaze you! Enjoy the experimet (video).

Source: TheRasteri

Optional Windows 8 Update Released: Bing Desktop

Earlier this year, Microsoft released “Bing Desktop” for Windows 7 that put a Bing search box on your desktop and also set Bing’s daily homepage pictures as your desktop background. That way, every day, you had a fresh, new, and high quality, desktop wallpaper. However, if you were an early adaptor of Windows 8, you might have known that Bing Desktop would only install and run on Windows 7. It would not install on a Windows 8 PC even with compatibility settings. But today, there is good news for Windows 8 users! Continue reading

Place Sticky Notes on your Start Screen

http://wscont2.apps.microsoft.com/winstore/1x/0c62fe51-e2c8-41db-b833-0a1e8e7ff422/Screenshot.41050.1000002.jpg

Windows 8 features the Sticky Notes app from Windows 7, but it’s outdated and doesn’t integrate with Metro and the Live Tiles. No fear, as we have a solution for you in the Windows Store. Sticky Tiles lets you place quick stick notes of various colors on your start screen for a quick reminder. You can add as many colorful notes you want to your Start screen, with each tiles either large or small.

Description

Post Notes, To Do Lists, Reminders etc. as Tiles on your Start Screen. Then, you can just glance at the tiles to get the information you care about in one place.Choose a size, Select a type, Pick a color, Jot down the data, Pin!
Rearrange, Resize, Group, Unpin the Sticky Tiles just like the other App Tiles on Start Screen.

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Features

  • 2 Tile sizes
  • 2 Tile types
  • 6 Tile colors

Download from Windows Store

Joining & Troubleshooting Homegroup in Windows 8

This post was prompted by a fellow having issues with his Homegroup settings in Windows 8. I hope it helps you overcome your issues too.

1. Right-click your Network Icon via the Taskbar
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2.
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3.
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5.
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After successful setup and joining of you Homegroup on all clients on your network, confirm you can see other clients in the Homegroup, open a few of them and see their shared files. You can use DLNA-aware Media players in the Store, like sMedio TrueLink+ to stream media shared by your Network Clients.

Still Can’t See Others?
If you still can’t see other clients, check to see that your Network has been setup as Home Network as follows:

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Do this on all Clients that should participate on your Homegroup, after this you should now see all other clients and what they are sharing. Remember, you DON’T need to turn Off Firewall, and you should never turnoff you firewall. If Bill Gates comes with a million bucks and asks me to Turn Off my firewall I will not do it. My principle is, if it doesn’t work with my Firewall turned ON, I am not going to use it. Homegroup works through Firewalls in both Windows 7 and Windows 8, if you are having Homegroup issues on any of your clients, run the Homegroup Troubleshooter instead of turning of your firewall.

All the best with your hunt.

- McAkins

Windows-RTM-God-Mode-GodMode

Use GodMode In Windows 7 For The Ultimate Control Panel

 

Ever get frustrated when you can’t find the option you’re looking for in Windows 7′s mess of a control panel? Well there is hope for you yet! There is a hidden feature in Windows 7 that allows you to view every conceivable option hidden in the Control Panel within one Window. Wondering how you can get this? Read on past the break. Continue reading

How to Access the Windows 7 Games Folder in Windows 8

This tutorial will guide you in enabling the Games Folder in Windows 8.

Games Folder

The games folder was introduced with Windows Vista and improved on Windows 7. It included games that came installed with Windows, like Chess and Solitaire, and it also added any new games you might have installed. The games folder also showed detailed information about the games, including high score, age ratings, and compatibility. If the developers allowed it, the games could be updated directly from the Games folder.

Continue reading