Apple Painted itself into a Corner

With all the nude leaks going on these last days, all linked to iCloud breach, and the thundering silence of Apple to respond officially to the allegations, I am smelling a rat. It is two days after the fact, and Apple is yet to go to town with their manipulative attitudes. That smells to me fishy. It is unlike Apple to keep quiet for so long. Even with a single gram of salt, they would have gone to town in damage-control mode.

All these points as far as I am concerned to the fact the damage is so tremendous, that it requires special handling. You see the problem is, this is Apple that told the world they are the “most secured” platform on planet earth. The SwitcherAds adage still rings in the ear with “We are Apple, we don’t get viruses” pompous exclamation.

This very hubris is turning out now to be the Apple’s downfall in security. When you’ve conditioned the world to accept that you’re invincible and all bullets just bounce off you thick hide, then it is difficult to now turn around and confess to the world that your platform is as porous as any other’s on the planet.

Once is an accident, twice is a curiosity, thrice is a habit. The number of Security breaches taking place in Apple’s paradise is becoming epidemic. The laxity of Apple to build security into it’s product at foundational level is now coming back to bite them where it hurts most.

We’ve told the masses that there is not a single company that knows security like Microsoft. When you’re the planet’s atlas, carrying 90% of the world OS usage on your shoulder, you’re the big target for malicious hackers. Microsoft has learnt its lessons by pressing the reset button with its Secured Computing initiative in the Vista timeframe. Right now, they are centuries ahead of competition in security. We’ve told you all along, now we’re being vindicated.

Who are you going to trust with your precious data in the Cloud. Well my choice is clear. My choice goes to that company that has been battle-tested, and so should yours. Now let’s continue to wait on Apple’s spin-doctors, to see which diversionary tactics they’re going to employ this time around.

Image Credits:

From <http://thestickmanspeaks.files.wordpress.com/2011/02/painted-into-a-corner.jpg>

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Dusting off McAkins Online

Credits: TQN.com

Ladies and gentlemen, we want to thank you for your patience with us for going AWoL on you these past two months. Naz was going through physical expatriation, and I was going through a hard time at work before going on a much deserved vacation of full 4-weeks.

Those of you that follow us on Twitter of course know I was doing micro-blogging the whole time. I just didn’t have the time nor the energy to write full quality blog posts like you’re used to from us.

Naz and I are now finally settling down. We promise to start bringing back awesome to McAkins Online. We thank @MajorSky17 for filling the gaps for us in our absence with nostalgic news videos about past Microsoft OSes. Now we are all back, and ready to bring you the usual Tech news from around the world.

Thank you and stay tuned.

Windows Fundamentals For Legacy PCs

 

In this bonus episode, I take a look at Windows Fundamentals For Legacy PCs (“FLP”), a little-known official Microsoft modification of Windows XP, designed for businesses still using hardware designed for Windows 9x to be able to run a more modern, safe and stable OS on their PCs. I end with a little fun trying to run the system on 64MB and 32MB RAM to see what happens. Continue reading

Windows XP Build 2481: “The Homestead Run”

In this video I wrap up our tour of the development of Windows XP with build number 2481, a pre-RTM build that heralded the completion of the GUI and out-of-box hardware compatibility for Windows XP, and was handed out to testers on 1st June 2001. Over the next few months, compiled builds were virtually identical and their primary function was to root out any last minute bugs that might wreak havoc on the projected release date of 25th October 2001. Thankfully, XP shipped as planned on this date, and firmly took its place in history as one of the most well-loved Windows operating systems. Continue reading

Windows XP Build 2475: “XP Finds Its Identity”

In this video I demonstrate the setup and UI of Windows Whistler build 2475 – one of the first builds of Windows Whistler to identify itself by the operating system’s recently-announced official name, “Windows XP”. This build was released to testers on 24th May 2001. Continue reading

Windows XP Build 2428: “Welcome To Windows, Luna”

In this video I demonstrate the setup and UI of Windows Whistler build 2428 (beta 2) which would eventually evolve into Windows XP. This build was shown to reviewers on 9th February 2001 – the same day that Microsoft announced the official name of Whistler – “Windows XP”. Continue reading

Windows XP Build 2419: “Hello World!”

In this video I demonstrate the setup and UI of Windows Whistler build 2419 – the third post-Beta 1 build of Whistler – which would eventually evolve into Windows XP. This build was first released to testers on 23rd January 2001 and was one of four post-Beta 1, pre-Beta 2 builds. Continue reading

Windows XP Build 2416: “Merlin’s Stage Entrance”

In this video I demonstrate the setup and UI of Windows Whistler build 2416 – the second post-Beta 1 build of Whistler – which would eventually evolve into Windows XP. This build was first released to testers on 16th January 2001 and was one of four post-Beta 1, pre-Beta 2 builds. Continue reading

Windows XP Build 2410: “Chartreuse Mongoose”

In this video I demonstrate the setup and UI of Windows Whistler build 2410 – the first post-Beta 1 build of Whistler – which would eventually evolve into Windows XP. This build was first released to testers on 4th January 2001 and was one of four post-Beta 1, pre-Beta 2 builds. Continue reading

Windows XP Build 2250: “…And The Ghosts Of Neptune”

We continue our investigation into the development of Windows XP with Windows Codename “Whistler” build 2250. This build of “Whistler” was compiled on the 28th June 2000 and was shown at the Professional Developers Conference 2000. This makes it the first “Whistler” build to be shared with developers outside of Microsoft. But 6 months on from Neptune, are we truly able to say goodbye? Continue reading

Windows XP Build 2223: “Goodbye Neptune, Hello Whistler”

Following the cancellation of Neptune, Microsoft put together a team of developers to start work on Whistler. This build is one of the first glimpses into their earliest developments. The long and short of it is that this equates to “not much”, but even the world’s (possibly) most-loved operating system had to start out from somewhere…mainly, Windows 2000! Continue reading

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